Tuesday, June 7, 2016

The Making Of An SCA Scroll, Part 2


My last post,,  was about the research, design, and calligraphy of my most recent scroll. This post will be about its illumination.




After the calligraphy, I penciled in my design concept. Then I used a black 005 Sakura Micron Pen to make chosen lines permanent. I then erased the pencil with a white eraser.










My next step is to paint all the mid-tone colors using as large a brush as possible for the area. Here I used a Winsor and Newton Sceptre Gold Pointed Round Series 101 size 1.

My gouache is mostly Winsor and Newton, but some I have made from natural pigments like in the class I taught.

For this scroll, I also used shell gold on Beitriz' heraldic arms. Although expensive for the amount you get, it handles just like gouache.








After the mid-tones and shell gold, I painted the white work. That included tiny lines over the already light beige vines. 

For this, I used a 2/0 size of the W&N Sceptre pointer round brushes. They're my favorite. I have them in many sizes.
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I then outlined all the edges with a black 01 Sakura Micron Pen and used it to scatter some tiny bees around. 


I shaded the folds in the dress on the lady at the bottom of the page with a wash of black paint. With more shell gold, I also painted what passes for tiny bees on her dress.






Finally, I got to what I think is the most fun, the minuscule details. Using my favorite Winsor and Newton brush, like I used for the white work, I painted the lady's face, her hair net, and tiny white flourishes throughout the blue border.


After looking at my reference, I added the red dots to the trefoils. It's those exceedingly tiny details that make the difference and add to any scroll's  medieval orthodoxy .











This is the result



Accomplished by ten fun filled, stiff back and frustrating days. 



But, I can't wait to be assigned my next one.