Sunday, March 11, 2018

Tips For Using Sakura Micron Pens

Micron Pens. Check out
the tiny tip of my biggest one.
As you might have noticed, I use Sakura Micron pens on most award scrolls. They are a modern convenience that replaces a quill for outlining before and after painting. 
These pens have waterproof, quick-drying archival pigment ink that does not feather or bleed through paper. When dry it is smear proof. Their black inks are intense and resist fading in sun or UV light.
Sakura developed their Micron pens to replace high-priced technical pens and still give you fine-line quality when used on paper. The non-conforming ways SCA scribes use Micron pens, however, were never intended.
The clogging issues I've had come from using it on paint or fabric. When anything blocks Micron's tiny plastic tube its ink doesn't get out of the barrel on to your surface. What can you do to encourage Micron pen's ink-flow?
Micron pen ink flows best when you use it with a light touch and a 90-degree angle to the surface. You'll also want to let your paint dry 24 hours before using them on it. 

Smaller Micron pen nibs are delicate. If you find a leak near the nib tip it could be caused by dropping, shaking, or spinning it in your hand. If you bend them easily, use a bigger size nib or lighter pressure. They also dry out quickly if you leave them uncapped.
My tricks for you, keep scrap paper or a paper towel sheet near, drawing lines on it until the ink flows freely again. Sometimes, I dip the nib in a water container first.
I prefer to buy Micron pens where I can remove the cap and see if the nib is adequate. Once in a great while, I find one without a visible tiny tip. Sadly, this happens more when I buy online.
Treated well you'll have your Micron pen to use for miles of outlining.

Related Prior Post:  
Why Lay a Scroll's Groundwork with Permanent Ink?